Matins legacy

Just by coincidence after watching the news yesterday it caught my eye that the next program had to do with Sundsvall. It was being shown on Swedish Public Television, SVT and the name of the program is Arvinge okänd, ( Heir unknown). I kept in on. The program featured a search for people who had died and where no persons were found to collect an inherance.

It was about Matin Kamal. I first met him when I was studying at Umeå University. I recalled how he told me about the many courses he had taken and somehow he was interested to talk to me. His Swedish was not good. This was sometime at the end of the seventies. Many years went by and he once again appeared and contacted me when I was chairman of a municipal committee some 10 years ago. I recall him presenting me with some ideas to meet challenges in immigration. By this time he was living in Sundsvall. 

Much of Matins personality came through in the program now some 5 years after his passing. He left 2 million Swedish Crowns and eventually the program found the children of his siblings in England and in Pakistan. 

Matin Kamal belongs to a group of people that having many ideas can never materialize them or get others to help them materialize them. For these and other reasons Matin never had a job. Having taken many courses at University does not help. 

I think many politicians can witness on having had this type of contacts. People like Matin look them up to try to convince them of ways to solve political challenges. 

We know that every brain is individual. We know that many ideas never come to being because the communication is not there. Matins legacy with help of this program was a step to understand people like him. 

People that came in contact with him understood that he had important plans and ideas. He wanted to help for a better social justice and he was concerned with climate change. He was generous when he could be and that is how he will be remembered by the few that knew or understood him. 

The Umeå years (2)

 

umeå

Umeå was not an inviting town in 1976. I felt lonely… My son has later described my homecomings at weekends as those of a stranger. I spent most of my time sitting in the library studying in order to get my teacher’s degree as fast as possible. It was a time for sacrifice. We did not have much money. The Swedish system with a study grant was important to our economy. In the summer I earned some money on summer jobs in Sundsvall.

There were some positive highlights that I will mention in coming texts concerning my years in Umeå. The first one I would mention was enrolling in the Social-Democratic Student Association. I learned on arrival that every student had to belong to the Student Union (kår). I also learned that students could elect their representatives to the student Parliament.

Umeå was still living the spirit of 1968. They were many discussions and debates concerning most things big and small. The SD students were radical and much on the left of the main party. The British “Militant” section of the Labour party was the inspiration. The ideas for the newspaper” Offensiv”, were based on Trotskij’s socialist defiance of Stalin Communism. When I enrolled I got involved in the matter at hand that had to do on whether or not a number of members of the club should be excluded. A decision was eventually taken and some of the “Offensiv” members were excluded and accused of infiltration. When I arrived most of these exclusions had already been carried through.

Maybe one should remember in what world we were living then with violent Vietnam war just ended after 20 years and quiet cold war dividing people and ideas.

The student club was a place to be welcomed in. The interest for international questions and politics engaged and excited me. I recall many of these colleagues and many interesting meetings we had. I was invited to travel to different towns in the north and Olle Westerlund’s old Volvo took us to places like Storuman in the Lapland interior. We travelled there through snowstorms and reindeer herds.

Here with Christer Holmgren and Christer Söderman in 1977

Usf

 

The Umeå years (1)

studentkår

When I had completed enough subjects in the Adult education (Komvux) courses, I applied to the University. At that time we discussed the two nearest alternatives, Uppsala and Umeå. The latter was further up north and Sweden’s newest University. I managed to get in on a sort of trial as I had not managed the level of Swedish required. I enrolled for the English AB course. It was meant that this subject would take a year. Due to my previous knowledge of English I decided to speed up the course. I did most of it within the term.

My student life in Umeå was all, but glamorous. I rented a furnished room at a private home in Scharinsvägen. Once again I had an elderly landlady. There were no cooking facilities so I needed to plan my meals so as not to get hungry at night, which I did not succeed very well in doing.

I came home at weekends especially in the beginning. I did not know anyone so I enrolled at the Social-Democratic Student Association.  

I got to and from Umeå by bus. These buses took between three and four hours and some stopped quite often.

My life in Umeå during these first years circled around the University. It was the most left winged environment in the Swedish academic world and I will come back to this. On the 20th November 1976 I got my first 40 academic points. I could come home for Christmas with a sense of duty accomplished.