Freddie and I


Well, here I am in Stone Town Zanzibar. This city stands in the center of a long historical trading period with the drama of slavery  included. A certain Dr. Livingstone played an valuable part in abolishing slavery here. I was shown the appalling conditions created to keep men and women as prisoners before being auctioned out.

I am posing in front of the house where Freddie Mercury (Farough Bulsar) opened his eyes for the first time. Freddie’s  father was a British Civil servant who came to the island from India. The Bursars belonged to an ancient minority that left Persia when it became Muslim, keeping their Zoroastrian traditions and religion through centuries during their India exile. Events to overthrow the Sultan from the island in 1964 sent the Bursars to London where they first settled in the Heathrow airport area where Mr. Bursar took up employment.

Queen’s music is the favorite in my home and Freddie Mercury’s voice and creative musical genius has had a strong standing throughout my life.

My mind boggles a little extra,  when I consider that I might very well have crossed a young Freddie in any of the streets around West Kensington where we both lived in the beginning of the seventies.

I wonder if any of those eccentric looking guys standing on underground platforms would not be the upcoming world artist oblivious of a famed future and destiny.

Curiously I do reflect on the fact that the most famous Zanzibari was not a real native the same way as Portugal’s most famous personality in the sixties – soccer player Eusebio- was an African arriving in Lisbon as a teenager to play for Benfica.

Immigration is not something you can ignore. It is instead a goldmine for development of the human race, provided immigrants are given opportunity to develop their skills.

Intensive meetings

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At the aftermath of media convulsion at home, our day continued with exchange of ideas and study of  the new education act. It was difficult to forget what was going on at home. It crossed my mind that perhaps people from Sundsvall should not leave the municipality. Bearing in mind that the only newspaper in town spares no ink on critizing the newly started this SiDA financed cooperation project. Same press that kept quiet when previous mayors did not even bother to leave municipal boundaries to create good relationship at regional level. Rather stay at home, seems to be the motto. 

For our part we do our tasks for the benefit of our town and country to the best of our ability. Thanks Ina Skandevall and Hans Zetterkvist for your commitment. 

The day business was comprehensive. The leaders of Makkunduchi gathered and an introduction to the history of the island was presented by former chief minister for Zanzibar Mr. Shamsi Vuai Nahodha. The topic of development targets, was described in a context of education. Skills needed were many for the young people of Zanzibar and vocational courses were referred to. Next week’s visit of principal Mr. Trevor Fisher, heading restaurant school might lead to interesting development within tourist related professions.

Questions were asked and participants discussed what the responsibilities of local government were and ought to be, taking into account that there is no real method for local financing. After that discussions continued with the reduced number of members of the committee getting into more limited and concrete ideas for cooperation between our two local authorities. 

Mrs Christin Strömberg met a number of bee keepers. Bee keeping being a possible development area in Makunduchi.

Tomorrow is Sunday and we have a day off which we will use for a visit  at the capital of Zanzibar- Stone town.